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REVIEW: ABBIE CARDWELL - THE BARE BONES SESSION
THE BARE BONES SESSION

Abbie Cardwell
THE BARE BONES SESSION

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Jenny O'Keefe Cherrie Magazine/PBS Radio
"Abbie Cardwell and Her Leading Men – The Bare Bones Session
(Rootsytoons Records/Vitamin) 5 stars

A sweet banjo lick leads into even sweeter vocals that will hook you
in to the rootsy rockabilly world of Abbie Cardwell, her brother Jeb
and phenomenal drummer Ashley Davies. Recorded live with no editing or
overdubbing, this solid release showcases what music should be –
addictive genius you can have on repeat for weeks."

Tim Ritchie Editor, Presentation & Production, ABC Radio National
"Abbie Cardwell is a Melbourne gal who plays banjo, guitar, harmonica and ukulele and sings with her band the Leading Men. Together they have played at many important venues and festivals across the globe. They deliver “rootsy-rockabilly-twang” and are equally at home with Abbie’s original songs as they are with covers from the book-of-famous-tunes.
 
This album not only allows you to hear Abbie, but it was recorded “live” with no editing or overdubs, so you get the feel of a band playing together. Recorded in Australia by a person who is the live sound engineer for Lisa Gerard (Dead Can Dance) and mixed in the US by Nick Didia who has worked with Bruce Springsteen, Powderfinger and Pearl Jam. It is a powerful listen and one that will have you asking “why haven’t I heard her before”

Ken Eavel, "Go For Broke", 106.7 PBS FM
"This brazen and beautifully honest album shuns technology for the magic that exists in the musical moment, to capture a perfectly measured dose of straight up superbly written country blues and two truly tasty covers, using the perfect combination of spice and sultriness, with precious space and a ton of soul to create a true timeless gem. Velvet & vine intertwined. 9/10."

Patrick Lang - DB Magazine
As well as being a sexy vamp with a Bettie Page haircut and a keen sense of vintage fashion, Abbie Cardwell has always been at her best when stripped back to basics, which is exactly what the ‘The Bare Bones Sessions’ is about.



Recorded completely live in just two days with her brother Jeb on guitar and drummer Ashley Davies, this is a record of, quite literally, bare bones songs – no overdubs, no studio trickery, just performance. The whole thing was then mixed by the near legendary Nick DiDia (the engineer for Bruce Springsteen’s ‘The Rising’) and handed back.



Always honest and often demonstrating a level of intimacy which some would consider too close for comfort, this is a pristine collection of studio tracks. Cardwell’s able genre hopping is a delight; she tackles country blues in a manner reminiscent of fellow countrywoman Abbe May on 52 Pick Up, delicate ukulele balladry on Oh! The Places You Will Go, as well as jumpy rockabilly

on the riotous Buttercup. Then there’s the jazz inflections of Darlin’ and the bluegrass of Open Road, demonstrating Cardwell as a performer with a mastery of any style, vindicating her title as ‘The Belle of Rootsy-Rockabilly-Twang’.



Her original songs feel remarkably genuine, not just pastiches of the genres that she’s working in. This is amplified by the fact that the three covers featured here – Bobbie Gentry’s Ode to Billie Joe, Ryan Adams’ Come Pick Me Up and a cheeky run through of Timbuk3’s 1984 hit The Future’s So Bright, I Gotta Wear Shades – sound like they were written by Cardwell in the first place.



‘The Bare Bones Session’ is the best way to experience Cardwell’s multiple charms, and a damn fine album of rootsy-rockabilly-twang goodness to boot.





Patrick Lang - DB Magazine
As well as being a sexy vamp with a Bettie Page haircut and a keen sense of vintage fashion, Abbie Cardwell has always been at her best when stripped back to basics, which is exactly what the ‘The Bare Bones Sessions’ is about.



Recorded completely live in just two days with her brother Jeb on guitar and drummer Ashley Davies, this is a record of, quite literally, bare bones songs – no overdubs, no studio trickery, just performance. The whole thing was then mixed by the near legendary Nick DiDia (the engineer for Bruce Springsteen’s ‘The Rising’) and handed back.



Always honest and often demonstrating a level of intimacy which some would consider too close for comfort, this is a pristine collection of studio tracks. Cardwell’s able genre hopping is a delight; she tackles country blues in a manner reminiscent of fellow countrywoman Abbe May on 52 Pick Up, delicate ukulele balladry on Oh! The Places You Will Go, as well as jumpy rockabilly

on the riotous Buttercup. Then there’s the jazz inflections of Darlin’ and the bluegrass of Open Road, demonstrating Cardwell as a performer with a mastery of any style, vindicating her title as ‘The Belle of Rootsy-Rockabilly-Twang’.



Her original songs feel remarkably genuine, not just pastiches of the genres that she’s working in. This is amplified by the fact that the three covers featured here – Bobbie Gentry’s Ode to Billie Joe, Ryan Adams’ Come Pick Me Up and a cheeky run through of Timbuk3’s 1984 hit The Future’s So Bright, I Gotta Wear Shades – sound like they were written by Cardwell in the first place.



‘The Bare Bones Session’ is the best way to experience Cardwell’s multiple charms, and a damn fine album of rootsy-rockabilly-twang goodness to boot.