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REVIEW: DAVID LANE - HEAD IN THE CLOUDS
Head In The Clouds

David Lane
Head In The Clouds

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MAG, 2009

Not to be confused with You Am I’s Davey Lane, this Mr. Lane also keeps good company. His four singer/songwriter styled albums are littered with name players who have leant their talents to his tasteful, beautifully performed pop songs. A Sydney institution, it’s only a matter of time before he’s discovered by the masses, and they discover a delightful body of work.

DOM MOORE, Beat Magazine 2009

David Lane’s Head In The Clouds is melodic, simple, nice and polished. A good pop record. To put it simply, the title track - and album opener - Head In the Clouds is easily better than any other acoustic pop songs played on high rotation on commercial radio. Head In The clouds is the sort of album one ought to put on when in need of uplifting. Recession music, let’s call it. The fourth track, It’s Not The End Of The Road, which features soulful and warm harmonic playing, would be enough to get a one armed mute happier and more optimistic than one of those cheery female weather ladies. And that is a big achievement.

It’s the combination of nice guitar and piano hooks, beautiful lyrics (even if they aren’t necessarily that provoking, or that inspirational) and the obvious charm of Lane that evokes these feelings of warmth and security. His lyrics throughout the whole album are exactly what you’d expect from a (good) pop record: they’re somewhat resembling rambling poetry, and not just some bullshit about how your heart yearns or love is blind, etc, which far too many of his ilk fall foul of. Listening to Head In The Clouds is relaxing and refreshing, like a musical glass of white wine after a tough day at the office.

Lanes an accomplished piano player, having taught himself through listening to Neil Young and Elton John as a teenager. His piano playing is showcased nicely in the second track, Mother Earth, an environmentally friendly ballad (“this could be the end, don’t you love mother earth”). With a genre where people generally tend to write generic crap about love and heartbreak, something with a bit of purpose stands out and it’s nice to know that there are people like Lane out there who try to cover some important issues in their music. The highlight, however, is track number five, Matchmaker. Your emotions role along with the bouncing drum beat, and, in terms of dynamics, soft and loud are used very well.

You ought to give David Lane’s fourth record a shot; especially if you’re a lover of pop music, but are maybe constantly annoyed with the generic nature and plainness of the rest of the stuff out there. This is pop at its best.



Aidan Roberts, Alternative Media Group 2009

Its very difficult to do anything remarkably different in the realm of the bittersweet folk-rock singers, and Sydneys David Lane has been forging his upbeat melancholic folk for a decade or more now. Ever youthful of voice, on this latest record Lane accomplishes a maturity of tone that does certainly set him apart from the masses. His bitingly accessible melodies shine stronger than ever before, and though David doesnt pursue the same kind of acerbic observations on life as Darren Hanlon, there is pleasantly weary confidence in his delivery that makes these songs an enjoyable journey for the audience. Whats it all worth, dont you love Mother Earth? he pleads breathlessly in Mother Earth, an affecting ballad of the ilk of Elton Johns Amoreena. Crystalline 12-string guitar and tin-pan-alley harmonicas infuse Tell Me You Care with a satisfying dose of 80s indie nostalgia. Lane has a sure handle on constructing a rollicking travelogue Morning Sun shines like the best of Lanes material, melancholic lyrical musings and tumbling guitars giving more than a gentle tip of the hat to The Smiths or The Las Son of a Gun. What works best about David Lanes songs are their honesty there is a satisfying chime to his singing that is genuinely intriguing. Despite the title of the record, Lanes head seems firmly grounded with a refreshing lack of pretense in his delivery of material that, although unlikely to change the world or generate an immediate tidal wave of popularity, nevertheless stirs the soul enough for several repeat listens.  Fly the flag, David, keeping it real.