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REVIEW: INGA LILJESTROM - QUIET MUSIC FOR QUIET PEOPLE
Quiet Music For Quiet People

Inga Liljestrom
Quiet Music For Quiet People

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Two Dangers

Inga Liljestrom
Two Dangers

Elk

Inga Liljestrom
Elk

Zolton, Lost In E minor.com

Inga Liljestrom is one of the talented young crop of jazzy intoned electro artists emerging out of the cloistered Australian scene and taking their distinctive sound out into the international market. She is a wonderfully gifted artist, possessed of a voice that is as strong as it is fragile. A couple of years ago I wrote a review of her then album Elk in street music weekly, The Brag: 'Liljestrom’s breathy tone is the catalyst to the expansive nature of Elk. It’s lush and atmospheric, dripping with melancholy but never weighed down by its emotive delivery. The opening track 'Film Noir', is the standout - the layered production the perfect foil for Liljestrom’s descriptive lyrics. But really the album is consistently good across all twelve tracks, suggesting that we have a new star within our midst'. And little has changed in the intervening time. She is still a star in the making and Quiet Music For Quiet People may well be the nudge that gets her across the line.



Evilchris, Cyclic Defrost Magazine 2006

While Sydney-based vocalist / composer Inga Liljestrom’s previous album ‘Elk’ on Groovescooter showed her working with lush, filmic instrumental backdrops, this latest offering ‘Quiet Music For Quiet People’ comes from a completely different place altogether. With the intent being to conjure up the atmosphere of stripped-back and fragile desert music, for this album Liljestrom gathered together a group of musicians who had never played together before for a completely improvised session recorded over two nights in a small Surrey Hills studio. The liner notes include the suggestion ‘Some songs have cracks you are completely welcome to fall into’; apt instructions for listening to the nine expansive tracks gathered here indeed. Throughout there’s certainly an ever-present desert vibe conjured up particularly by John Carr’s use of dobro and lap steel, with the blend between the aforementioned elements and Liljestrom’s heavily-reverbed vocals at points calling to mind the similarly desert-inclined Hope Sandoval. It’s the ‘cracks’ in these recordings that particularly adds an intriguing edge here however, whether in the form of ‘accidental’ sounds captured during the improvised recording process, or in the subtle electronic textures and samples that Alon Ilsar and Bob Scott scatter amongst the live instrumentation. Equally intriguing is the inescapably European flavour that Liljestrom’s own Swiss heritage brings to proceedings, a quality that particularly rears its head amidst the sweeping strings and treated vocals of ‘Lost Highway’, dragging this well away from predictable Americana. An inspired collection that captures Liljestrom’s talents in perhaps their most mesmerising instrumental setting yet.