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REVIEW: LUCIE THORNE - WHERE NIGHT BIRDS CALL
Where Night Birds Call

Lucie Thorne
Where Night Birds Call

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Everything Sings Tonight

Lucie Thorne
Everything Sings Tonight

The Rushing Dark (Single)

Lucie Thorne
The Rushing Dark (Single)

Bonfires In Silver City

Lucie Thorne
Bonfires In Silver City

Black  Across The Field

Lucie Thorne
Black Across The Field

The Bud

Lucie Thorne
The Bud

Botticelli Blue Eyes

Lucie Thorne
Botticelli Blue Eyes

Canberra Times Review 2007


There are plenty of folk songwriters who try to grab you and hit you
over the head with their message; Victoria’s Lucie Thorne is not one of
them.
 
Instead, Thorne creates an enchanted forest of gentle sounds, wistful melodies and almost whispered vocals that lures in the listener.  Thorne’s voice
is well south of most women singers, but with that lower register is a gorgeousfloating quality, particularly in her gossamer harmonies.  Thorne owes more to
Joni Mitchell than Ani Di Franco, exploring the recesses of the heart rather than politics.  Lyrically, she excels in suggesting deep emotional pain with economy and evocative power: the colours bleed from the hills, a lover’s mile-long stare lowers to the empty glass between them. ‘The Movies’ is a bittersweet character portrait, a successful new approach for Thorne.  The mysterious ‘I Have Been a Soldier Too’ will haunt you for days.  The guitar tapestry woven by Thorne and Heath Cullen – acoustics and muted electrics – is a lesson in musical empathy.  ‘Where Night Birds Call’ is every bit as entrancing as it’s criminally ignored predecessor, ‘The Bud’.






Sydney Morning Herald

Thorne is one member of the elite club of local singer/songwriters
(think Holly Throsby, Clare Bowditch) creating sublime folk/pop




The Age

The songs on Where Night Birds Call are close enough to touch. Thorne's near-whispered, lovelorn vignettes are startlingly and infinitely believable; spare and skeletal in terms of ideas and arrangements but beautifully lush and textured in their rendering of thematic, tonal and melodic detail. Weary, lovelorn ballads (The Upfield Line, Home Sized Town, Night Drive) are pitched against strikingly pared-back rock (The Movies, Five Years and the sublime self-sung harmonies of Shot in the Dark) with a rare, natural ease.

****





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